STORIES

EDM Fests Keep Hospitals Busy

By David Jenison on January 3, 2018

A new study in The Journal of Emergency Medicine might be a buzzkill for modern ravers. 

"Emergency Department Patient Burden from an Electronic Dance Music Festival" looked at patient numbers, lengths of stay and complaints from people who arrived at the hospital from a three-day EDM festival nearby. Over the three days, 28 festival attendees—ranging in age from 18 to 29 with an average age of 21 years—required emergency care. Twenty-five patients had issues related to substance use (led by alcohol and MDMA), three required intensive care and 11 required sedative medication. The average patient stayed 265 minutes, with the longest stay lasting 347 minutes. 

The Chicago-based researchers noted that most admissions were clustered in the evenings and required extended lengths of stay and high levels of care. Hospital admissions were rare, but the data highlights the need to anticipate a spike in care when EDM events take place close to a medical facility. 

Of course, the data also highlights the need for responsible drug and alcohol use at music events. This includes monitoring the substance use of friends and loved ones, especially if they are younger and less experienced in self-moderating their drinking, smoking and tripping. 

The Most Lit Song Each Year Since 1924

GET Eden Extracts

The 1920s: When Music First Lit Up

Most Lit Cannabis Song Each Year in the 1930s

There's a Campaign to Legalize Medical Shrooms

Celebrate National Beer Day with These Infused Brews

12 Twitter Gems from the Man Arrested for Threatening a Congressman over Cannabis

Most Lit Cannabis Song Each Year in the 1940s

New Cannabis Polls All Point in the Same Direction

Lucky Researchers Say Cannabis Promotes Better Sex

A Familiar Face Tops Asia's New Best Restaurant List

So Apparently Cannabis Helps Prevent Beer Goggles

The 1950s: The Lost Decade for Cannabis-Themed Music

I Visited a Satanist and Saw the Potential for Salvation

How People Are Using Kratom to Overcome Opioid Abuse