STORIES

Please Don't Hide a Nuclear Warhead in Your Weed!

By David Jenison on February 26, 2017

Trent Franks, a name that makes you think Hot Dog on a Stick mascot, is actually a Republican House Member from the great state of Arizona. Franks is famous for such mouth vomit as "half of all black children are aborted" making abortion worse than "the policies of slavery" and that rape rarely results in pregnancies. He seems like a bitter man, which makes sense since his actual first name is Harry, and Harry Franks sounds like a porn name for a "grizzly bear" site. 

Right about now you're probably thinking, "How did Trump not give this guy a cabinet position?"

Harry is also a fan of cannabis prohibition, and he made a priceless comment on CNN this week that reinforces his view: "We sometimes used to make the point that if someone wanted to smuggle a dangerous weapon into America, even a nuclear weapon, how would they do it? The suggestion is, maybe we’ll hide it in a bale of marijuana."

Harry is actually not the first person to suggest that drug lords could smuggle a nuclear warhead into the country by hiding it in cannabis bales, but this is one of the weakest arguments for prohibiting cannabis. The reality is that prohibition props up drug lords and smuggling routes, but make cannabis and its cultivation legal, and the El Chapos of this world will be forced to smuggle bombs in piles of Chiclets instead. Then maybe Harry can call for a prohibition on candy instead. 

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